The Kindle Thing

I firmly belong to the camp of unapologetic book lovers and I am completely and possibly irrationally against this whole Kindle thing. Yes, I refuse to acknowledge its technological prowess, and I insist on calling it a /despicable/ thing despite the irony that I am in fact an engineer by profession. Oh, I will use my nifty iPhone to upload that snazzy picture I instagrammed the shit out of. And I will not dare to venture out on these strange and mysterious roads without Google maps. (I have neither a shred of direction sense nor an internal compass. I can barely make it to work and back everyday. Yes, I’m that pathetic)

But I digress. Like many precocious smartassy kids with no friends to speak of, I grew up on a diet of books. And honestly, nothing can really replace those childhood memories of reading with a torch under the blankets after bedtime. Or impatiently unwrapping presents I knew were books, every single birthday. Writing my name and the date on every single book that I own (over three thousand would be my guesstimate). Poring over the same books, getting them all dog-eared and growing into them like my favourite sweater. Discovering something new every time I read those pages. Every single blessed memory, I associate with a physical, feel-in-my-hands, feel-in-my-soul book.

I use my ample experience in book reading as a passport to book snobbery. The Kindle is just so, mainstream man. I mean, what true book lover would profess to reading 50 Shades of Grey on a plastic screen. (I haven’t read the damn thing, I swear it. I will admit to reading about a certain sparkly sexist blood sucker though. I’m ashamed, truly. I have since made up for that travesty by starting on War and Peace). How can an entire library of e-Books ever replace an entire library of actual books? “Here kids, let me transfer to you my entire life’s collection on the Cloud.” Blech. Technology, please don’t devour the most precious things I own (my shoes come a close second though). We can co-exist. I hope.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “The Kindle Thing

  1. I smiled as I read, “nothing can really replace those childhood memories of reading with a torch under the blankets after bedtime.”. Been there, despite repeated requests by parents to GO TO SLEEP :). Technology can definitely co-exist. While I read the entire Kite Runner on my laptop, its just not the same as curling up with a book.
    Back in school, I remember there was a Roald Dahl phase, a Goosebumps phase, a Dick King-Smith phase, Beverly Cleary, and so many other authors that made childhood an adventure. Especially loved Bruce Coville’s “My Teacher is an Alien” series and “Magic Book Shop”. One of my most favourite books (even today) is the Trumpet of the Swan, by E.B. White. Lovely story about a mute swan, who learns how to play a trumpet to communicate.

    Totally get what you mean about getting attached to a book.

    Most recently, I finished reading Maximum City by Suketu Mehta. It’s changed the way I perceive Mumbai, a city I thought I knew.

    What are you reading now?

    • I used to ignore the ‘requests’ too and I ended up with a thick pair of glasses when I was 6 years old. My mom was definitely not pleased. In school, I was a big Enid Blyton till around class 5 I think, also the usual Nancy Drew and Roald Dahl phase which was followed by a detective phase.. Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot.

      Trumpet of the Swan sounds really interesting actually, I haven’t read that one. I think I will. Currently, I’m re-reading old books, something I haven’t had a chance to do in a while. But I think the last new one I read was Dan Brown’s Inferno and it kind of sucked.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s